What Does It Mean When Your Poop Is Green? Is it Good or Bad?

As we all know, poop comes in different colors, shapes, and sizes. However, when you see green poop in the toilet bowl, it can be quite concerning. Most times, people wonder what causes this sudden change in color and whether they should be worried about their health. In this article with Impeccable Nest, we will explore what green poop means, its causes, and when to seek medical attention.

What Does It Mean When Your Poop Is Green? Is it Good or Bad?

What Does it Mean When Your Poop is Green?

The color, texture, and odor of your poop can provide valuable insight into your digestive health. While most people may not pay much attention to their stool, it is important to know that occasional changes in color, consistency, and frequency can indicate underlying health issues.

Green poop is a common concern among many individuals. It can be quite alarming to see green-colored stool in the toilet bowl, especially if you are not aware of the possible causes. However, in most cases, green poop is usually harmless and resolves on its own without any medical intervention.

Read more: Dreaming of Poop Meaning: 20+ Interpretations You Need to Know

As mentioned earlier, bile is responsible for the yellow-green hue of your poop. Bile contains bilirubin, a pigment that gives the feces its characteristic brown color upon digestion. When the stool passes rapidly through the colon, there may not be enough time for bilirubin to break down, leading to the appearance of greenish or yellowish stool.

In addition to fast transit time, consuming certain foods and medications can also cause green poop. For example, eating large quantities of green leafy vegetables such as spinach, kale, and broccoli can result in green stool. This is because these vegetables contain chlorophyll, which can tint the feces green.

Similarly, taking iron supplements can also affect stool color. Iron supplementation can cause the feces to appear dark green or even black in some cases. Artificial food coloring agents like green gelatin, candy, and popsicles can also produce green stool.

Certain medical conditions can also lead to green poop. For instance, infectious agents like E.coli and Salmonella can cause diarrhea, which may be accompanied by green stool. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), celiac disease, and lactose intolerance can also contribute to changes in stool color.

In conclusion, green poop is usually not a cause for concern unless it is accompanied by other symptoms such as abdominal pain, cramping, diarrhea, or fever. However, if you notice persistent changes in stool color or consistency, it is advisable to seek medical attention to rule out any underlying health issues. Maintaining a healthy diet, staying hydrated, and avoiding excessive alcohol intake can also help promote healthy bowel movements and prevent digestive disorders.

What Causes Green Poop?

There are a few potential causes of green-colored stool:

Diet

The most common cause of green poop is the food you eat. Green vegetables like spinach, kale, broccoli, and herbs contain large amounts of chlorophyll, a green pigment that can turn your stool green. Food coloring found in drinks like sports beverages and ice pops can also cause green stool. Consuming large amounts of iron-rich foods or supplements can lead to black or green poop as well.

Medication

Certain medications can lead to green stool, including antibiotics, anti-diarrheal medicines, and others. Iron supplements are a common culprit, as excess iron is excreted through stool. Laxatives with a stimulant effect often cause diarrhea and subsequent greenish stool.

Bile and Digestive Issues

The speed at which food moves through the intestines can affect stool color. Diarrhea causes food to move through faster, which means there’s less time for bile to break down completely. Bile is a green fluid produced by the liver that helps digest fats. So when bile passes through undigested, it can make stool appear green. Medical conditions affecting bile excretion like Crohn’s disease may also lead to green stool.

Infections

Certain bacterial, viral, and parasitic infections that affect the digestive system can lead to green diarrhea as well as other symptoms like nausea, cramping, and dehydration. Common examples include norovirus and rotavirus infections that cause acute gastroenteritis inflammation.

What Does It Mean When Your Poop Is Green And Runny?

Poop, also known as stool or feces, is the solid waste excreted from the body after digestion. Normal poop comes in a range of colors, textures, and shapes depending on what you eat and how your digestive system functions. However, if you notice that your poop is green and runny, it could indicate an underlying health issue.

Green poop is not always a cause for concern. Sometimes it is simply due to the presence of bile, which is a yellow-green fluid produced by the liver and stored in the gallbladder. Bile plays an essential role in fat digestion and absorption in the small intestine. When bile enters the large intestine too quickly, it may not have enough time to break down completely, resulting in green-colored poop.

However, if your green poop is also runny or watery, it could be a sign of diarrhea. Diarrhea is a common condition characterized by loose, watery stools that occur more frequently than usual. It can be caused by a variety of factors, including viral or bacterial infections, food allergies or intolerances, certain medications, and underlying digestive disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

One possible cause of green and runny poop is gastroenteritis, which is an inflammation of the stomach and intestines usually caused by a viral or bacterial infection. Gastroenteritis can cause a wide range of symptoms, including diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and fever. In most cases, it resolves on its own within a few days, but if your symptoms are severe or last for more than a few days, you should seek medical attention.

Another possible cause of green and runny poop is food poisoning. Food poisoning occurs when you consume contaminated food or water, leading to symptoms such as diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and stomach cramps. Some types of food poisoning, such as those caused by E. coli or Campylobacter bacteria, can cause green-colored poop.

Crohn’s disease is another potential cause of green and runny poop. Crohn’s disease is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease that affects the entire digestive tract, from the mouth to the anus. It can cause a variety of symptoms, including diarrhea, abdominal pain, weight loss, and fatigue, as well as complications such as intestinal blockages and abscesses. If you have Crohn’s disease or suspect that you might, it’s important to see a doctor for diagnosis and treatment.

What Does It Mean When Your Poop Is Green While Pregnant?

As a pregnant woman, it’s normal to pay close attention to any changes in your body, including your bowel movements. If you notice that your poop is green while pregnant, it might be concerning, but it’s important to understand that this isn’t always a cause for alarm. There are several factors that can lead to green stool during pregnancy.

One of the most common causes of green poop during pregnancy is hormonal changes. The increase in hormones can affect your digestive system and cause your stool to change in color and consistency. Additionally, prenatal vitamins or supplements containing iron can also lead to green poop. Iron can be difficult for the body to process, and it can cause a change in the color of your stool.

However, green poop during pregnancy can also indicate other health issues. For instance, green stool can be a sign of infection, particularly if it’s accompanied by other symptoms such as fever, abdominal pain, or diarrhea. In some cases, gestational diabetes can also cause green poop due to increased levels of glucose in the body.

If you’re experiencing green poop during pregnancy, it’s important to consult with your OB-GYN to rule out anything serious. Your doctor may ask you about other symptoms you’re experiencing, such as nausea, vomiting, fever, or abdominal pain. They might recommend additional testing, such as blood work or a stool sample, to determine the underlying cause of your green poop.

In the meantime, there are steps you can take to help alleviate the symptoms of green poop. You might try increasing your water intake to stay hydrated, which can help ease your digestion and prevent dehydration. Additionally, you can try eating more fiber-rich foods such as whole grains, fruits, and vegetables, which can promote healthy digestion and bowel movements.

What Does It Mean When Your Poop Is Green And Brown?

Poop, also known as stool or feces, is the solid waste product that is excreted from the body after digestion. The color of poop can vary from person to person and can be influenced by several factors such as diet, medications, and underlying health conditions. While brown is the most common color of poop, it is not uncommon for it to be green at times.

Green poop can sometimes be alarming, but in most cases, it is nothing to worry about. In fact, green poop is usually a sign of rapid digestion, which means that food is moving through your intestines quickly. When food moves through the digestive system too quickly, it means that the body has less time to absorb nutrients like bile salts, which are responsible for giving poop its typical brown color. As a result, the stool appears green.

There are several reasons why poop may move through the digestive system too quickly, leading to green poop. One common cause is diet. Eating foods that are high in fiber, such as fruits and vegetables, can speed up digestion and lead to green poop. Similarly, consuming foods that contain artificial colors or dyes may also cause stool to appear green.

In some cases, medication or supplements can also cause poop to turn green. For example, iron supplements can alter the color of stool, making it appear green. Other medications that may cause green poop include antibiotics, laxatives, and antacids.

While green poop on its own is usually not a cause for concern, there are certain circumstances when it may indicate an underlying health problem. For example, if you experience other symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, or nausea, it may be a sign of a gastrointestinal issue such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In rare cases, green poop may also be a sign of an infection or parasite.

What Does It Mean When Your Poop Is Green For 3 Days?

As unpleasant as it may be to discuss, the quality and consistency of our bowel movements can give us insight into the health of our digestive system. Normally, a healthy bowel movement should be brown in color, which is due to the presence of bile produced by the liver. However, sometimes, people may experience changes in the color of their stool, and one such change that often causes concern is green stool.

If your poop has been green for three days or more, this could indicate an issue with your digestive system. There are several possible reasons for this change in color, including infection, inflammation, or blockage in your gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Let’s take a closer look at some of the most common causes of green stool:

  1. Food: One of the most common reasons for green stool is diet. Certain foods like leafy green vegetables, food coloring used in certain processed foods, and iron supplements can cause stool to turn green. If you’ve recently had a meal that contained lots of leafy greens or food coloring, it’s possible that this could be the reason for your green stool.
  1. Infection: Another possible explanation for green stool is infection. This could be from a bacterial, viral, or parasitic infection in your gut. Such infections can cause inflammation in your GI tract, leading to diarrhea, abdominal pain, and other symptoms. If you suspect that you have an infection, it’s important to seek medical attention promptly before it worsens.
  1. Medications: Certain medications like antibiotics can alter the balance of bacteria in your gut, leading to changes in stool color. Additionally, some laxatives and antidiarrheal medications can cause stool to turn green.
  1. Malabsorption: Sometimes, green stool can be an indication of malabsorption, which occurs when your body is unable to absorb nutrients properly. Conditions like celiac disease or Crohn’s disease can cause malabsorption, leading to green stool.
  1. Bile: Lastly, green stool can be caused by an excess of bile in your intestines. This can occur when bile is not properly metabolized, resulting in it being eliminated in the stool. This can be a sign of a more serious underlying condition like liver disease or gallbladder problems.

If you are experiencing green stool for three days or more, it’s important to seek medical attention. Your doctor will likely ask you about your diet, medication use, and other symptoms to determine the cause of your green stool. Depending on the underlying cause, treatment may involve medication, dietary changes, or other interventions.

What Does It Mean When Your Poop Is Green And Black?

As unpleasant as it may be to talk about, our bowel movements can reveal a lot about our overall health. The color, consistency, and frequency of our poop can provide important clues about what’s going on in our digestive system. In this case, if you notice that your stool is green and black, it could be a sign of internal bleeding.

The green coloration in the stool comes from bile mixing with blood. Bile is a yellow-green fluid that’s produced by the liver and helps to break down fats in our food. It’s normally released into the small intestine, where it mixes with food and turns brown as it passes through the large intestine. However, if there’s bleeding somewhere in the digestive tract, the blood can mix with the bile before it has a chance to turn brown, resulting in green-colored stool.

The blackness in the stool, on the other hand, occurs as a result of the oxidation of the blood. When blood is exposed to air, it begins to break down and turn dark in color. This is why old blood often looks black or dark brown. If you see black stool, it’s a sign that the bleeding is happening higher up in the digestive tract, such as in the stomach or small intestine.

There are several possible reasons why someone might experience green and black stool. One common cause is ulcers, which are open sores that develop on the lining of the stomach or small intestine. Ulcers can be caused by a number of factors, including infection with the bacterium Helicobacter pylori, medications like aspirin or ibuprofen, or excess acid production in the stomach.

Another possible cause of green and black stool is cancer. Tumors in the digestive tract can bleed, and the blood can mix with bile and turn the stool green. Hemorrhoids, which are swollen veins in the rectum or anus, can also cause bleeding and lead to green and black stool.

Regardless of the cause, if you notice that your stool is green and black, it’s important to seek medical attention right away. Internal bleeding can be a serious condition that requires immediate treatment. Your doctor will likely perform a physical exam and may order tests like blood work, stool samples, or imaging studies to determine the cause of the bleeding.

In some cases, treatment for green and black stool may involve medications to reduce inflammation or acid production, antibiotics to clear infections, or surgery to remove tumors or repair damaged tissue. Your doctor will work with you to develop a customized treatment plan based on your specific needs and the underlying cause of your symptoms.

What Does It Mean When Your Poop Is Green And Soft?

When it comes to our bowel movements, we tend to pay attention to their color, texture, and consistency. Green and soft poop can be alarming for some people who are not used to seeing this in the toilet bowl. However, in most cases, green and soft stool is not a cause for concern.

There are several reasons why your poop may turn green and have a softer consistency. One possible reason is that you may have consumed foods that are high in fiber such as leafy greens, broccoli, beans, and whole grains. These types of foods are known to promote healthy digestion and can help regulate bowel movements. They also contain chlorophyll, which can give your stool a greenish hue.

Another possible reason for green and soft poop could be due to medications that you are taking. Antibiotics, iron supplements, and laxatives can all affect the color and texture of your stool. If you have recently started taking a new medication and notice a change in your bowel movements, it’s a good idea to speak with your healthcare provider.

In some cases, green and soft poop may be an indicator of an overgrowth of bacteria in the small intestine. This condition is known as small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), and it can cause a range of digestive symptoms, including bloating, gas, and diarrhea. SIBO occurs when there is an imbalance of bacteria in the gut, which can be caused by factors such as diet, stress, or certain medical conditions.

If you are experiencing other symptoms along with green and soft poop, such as abdominal pain or nausea, it’s important to talk to your doctor. They may recommend further testing to determine the underlying cause of your symptoms.

In most cases, green and soft poop is not a cause for concern and will resolve on its own. However, if you notice persistent changes in your bowel movements, it’s essential to seek medical advice. Your healthcare provider can help you identify the underlying cause of your symptoms and provide appropriate treatment if necessary.

What Does It Mean When Your Poop Is Green Diarrhea?

When it comes to our bowel movements, most of us tend to avoid talking about it or acknowledging it unless there is a problem. However, paying attention to the color and consistency of our poop can be an important indicator of our digestive health. One such instance is when you notice that your poop is green in color and watery in consistency; this could indicate that you have green diarrhea.

Green diarrhea occurs when food moves too quickly through your intestines, which causes your body to excrete less bile than usual. Bile is a digestive fluid produced by the liver that helps break down fats in our diet. It has a yellowish-green color and gives our poop its characteristic brown color. However, if your digestive system doesn’t have enough time to process the bile, it can result in green poop.

Several factors can cause green diarrhea. One common cause is a bacterial infection in your gut. When harmful bacteria enter your digestive system, it can cause inflammation and disrupt the normal functioning of your digestive tract. This can lead to loose stools that are green in color.

Food poisoning is another culprit that can cause green diarrhea. Consuming contaminated food or water can introduce harmful bacteria or viruses into your body, leading to vomiting, nausea, and diarrhea. The green color of your poop in this case is due to the presence of biliverdin, a pigment that’s also responsible for the green color of bruises.

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is another possible cause of green diarrhea. IBD is a chronic condition that affects the digestive system, causing inflammation and irritation of the intestinal lining. This can lead to frequent diarrhea, abdominal pain, and other digestive symptoms. In some cases, IBD can also cause malabsorption of nutrients, leading to weight loss and nutrient deficiencies.

If you’re experiencing green diarrhea, it’s essential to stay hydrated as diarrhea can cause dehydration in the body. Drinking plenty of fluids like water, coconut water, or electrolyte fluids can help replenish the lost fluids and electrolytes from the body. It’s also essential to rest and give your digestive system time to heal.

If the symptoms of green diarrhea persist for more than a day or two, it is advisable to see a doctor. The doctor may perform a physical exam, order lab tests, and stool culture to determine the underlying cause of your symptoms. Treatment for green diarrhea may involve antibiotics if bacterial infection is present, anti-inflammatory drugs for IBD, or simple dietary changes that can help restore balance in the gut.

What Does It Mean When Your Poop Is Green And You Didn’t Eat Anything Green?

Many people may feel concerned or confused when they notice that their stool is green, particularly if they haven’t consumed anything green recently. Generally speaking, the color of your feces can provide insight into your digestive system and overall health. In most cases, feces range in color from brown to tan, with variations in hue and saturation depending on individual diet, hydration levels, and other factors.

However, seeing green-colored stool without any recent consumption of green foods can indicate an underlying issue. Here are some possible reasons why your poop might be green even though you haven’t eaten anything green:

  1. Bile: One of the most common causes of green stool is the presence of bile. Bile is a fluid produced by your liver that helps digest fats and absorb fat-soluble vitamins. Normally, bile is greenish-yellow in color and mixes with your food as it moves through the intestines. However, if food moves too quickly through your digestive tract, bile doesn’t have time to break down fully, leading to green-colored feces.
  1. Medications: Certain drugs, supplements, and vitamins can also cause green stools. For example, iron supplements, antibiotics, and laxatives can all alter the color of your feces. In most cases, this is not a cause for concern. However, if you’re taking multiple medications or supplements, it’s important to speak with your healthcare provider to rule out any possible interactions or side effects.
  1. Infections and Inflammatory Conditions: Green-colored stool can also be a sign of infection or inflammation in the digestive system. For instance, conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), celiac disease, and infectious diarrhea can affect the absorption of nutrients and lead to green feces. Other symptoms that may accompany green stool due to these conditions include abdominal pain, bloating, nausea, vomiting, and fever.
  1. Rapid Digestion: If you’ve been experiencing diarrhea or have been experiencing rapid digestion, it could cause the green color of your stool. This is because the food that you eat doesn’t spend enough time in your intestines for the bile to be broken down and turn brown.
  1. Food Coloring: In some cases, the green color of your stool may be due to the presence of artificial dyes or natural coloring agents found in certain foods. For example, eating a lot of green-colored candy, drinks, or other processed foods can change the color of your feces temporarily.

If you’re experiencing green stool and are concerned about your health, it’s important to pay attention to any other symptoms you may be having. These could include abdominal pain, diarrhea, fever, nausea, vomiting, or changes in appetite or weight.

In most cases, green-colored stool is not a cause for alarm and will go away on its own. However, if you’re experiencing persistent or severe symptoms, or have noticed other changes in your bowel movements, it’s best to see a healthcare provider. They can perform tests to determine the underlying cause of your green-colored stool and develop an appropriate treatment plan based on your individual needs and health history.

What Does It Mean When Your Poop Is Green And Burns?

When it comes to our bowel movements, we often look out for changes in color, shape, and consistency, as they can indicate a wide range of health issues. Green poop is one such change that may leave us feeling concerned, especially if it’s accompanied by a burning sensation. So what could this mean?

Firstly, it’s normal for our stool to vary in color depending on our diet. Certain foods such as leafy greens, iron supplements, and food coloring can all cause green-colored stool. However, if your poop is consistently green and burns, it may suggest an underlying health issue.

One possible explanation for green and burning poop is inflammation in the rectum or anal canal. This could be due to conditions such as hemorrhoids or anal fissures, which can cause discomfort and pain during bowel movements. Hemorrhoids are swollen veins in the anus and rectum that can bleed and become inflamed due to straining during bowel movements. Meanwhile, anal fissures are small tears in the lining of the anus that can cause sharp pain and burning sensations.

Another possible cause of green and burning poop is a sexually transmitted infection (STI) such as chlamydia or gonorrhea. These infections can cause inflammation and discharge from the vagina or penis, as well as burning and itching around the anus.

If you’re experiencing green stool that burns, it’s important to see a doctor to determine the root cause and get appropriate treatment. Your doctor may perform a physical exam, review your medical history, and order tests such as a stool analysis or colonoscopy to diagnose the underlying condition.

Treatment will depend on the specific cause of your symptoms. For example, if you have hemorrhoids or anal fissures, your doctor may recommend over-the-counter creams or ointments to reduce inflammation and ease pain. In severe cases, surgery may be necessary. If you have an STI, your doctor may prescribe antibiotics or antiviral medication to clear the infection and prevent future complications.

In conclusion, green stool that burns may indicate inflammation in the rectum or anal canal, which could be due to a range of underlying health issues such as hemorrhoids, anal fissures, or STIs. If you’re experiencing these symptoms, don’t hesitate to see a doctor for proper diagnosis and treatment.

What Does It Mean When Your Poop Is Green And Your Stomach Hurts?

Green stool accompanied by stomach pain can be a cause of concern for many people. The color of your stool is often an indication of what’s going on in your digestive system. In most cases, green poop is not a major cause for alarm. However, when it’s accompanied by stomach pain, it could indicate an underlying problem that requires medical attention.

One common cause of green stool and stomach pain is food poisoning. This occurs when you consume contaminated foods or drinks that contain harmful bacteria, viruses, or parasites. The symptoms typically include vomiting, diarrhea, fever, and stomach cramps. If you suspect that you have food poisoning, it’s important to stay hydrated and seek medical attention if the symptoms persist for more than a few days.

Another potential cause of green stool and stomach pain is gastroenteritis. This is an inflammation of the lining of the stomach and intestines, typically caused by a viral or bacterial infection. The symptoms of gastroenteritis include diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. In most cases, the condition will resolve on its own within a few days. However, if the symptoms persist or become severe, medical treatment may be necessary.

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is another possible cause of green stool and stomach pain. IBD includes conditions such as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, which cause inflammation and damage to the digestive tract. The symptoms of IBD include diarrhea, abdominal pain, fatigue, and weight loss. Treatment for IBD typically involves medication and lifestyle changes to manage symptoms and prevent complications.

If you’re experiencing severe abdominal pain, fever, or dehydration, it’s important to seek medical attention immediately. These symptoms could indicate a serious condition that requires urgent treatment. Your doctor will perform a physical exam and may order diagnostic tests such as blood work, stool analysis, or imaging studies to determine the underlying cause of your symptoms.

When to See a Doctor

In most cases, green stool is normal and not a cause for concern. You likely don’t need to see a doctor if it’s caused by:

  • Green leafy vegetables, green food coloring, or iron supplements
  • Occasional diarrhea from a virus or food poisoning
  • Mild gastrointestinal upset

You should make an appointment with your doctor if green stool is accompanied by:

  • Persistent diarrhea lasting over 3 days
  • Signs of dehydration like dizziness, dry mouth, and dark yellow pee
  • Severe pain or cramping
  • Unintended weight loss
  • Bleeding from the rectum
  • A fever above 101.5°F (38.6°C)

Seeking timely medical care is recommended if you have an underlying gastrointestinal condition like Crohn’s disease or experience chronic green diarrhea.

Diagnosing the Cause of Green Stool

To get to the root cause of green stool, a doctor will typically:

  • Ask about your symptoms, diet, and any medications you’re taking
  • Perform a physical exam to check for signs of dehydration and malnutrition
  • Order stool cultures to test for bacteria, parasites, or inflammation
  • Schedule additional tests like a colonoscopy or CT scan if a serious condition like cancer is suspected

Based on the test results, your doctor can prescribe medications to stop diarrhea, replace lost nutrients, or treat an underlying infection. Dietary changes, probiotic supplements, and rehydration may also be recommended.

Tips for Dealing with Green Poop

If green stool is caused by what you eat and not an underlying medical issue, try these remedies to help return your stool to a normal brown color:

  • Limit green foods – Avoid large amounts of leafy greens, green juices, popsicles, and ice cream with green food coloring.
  • Increase fiber – Boosting fiber with whole grains, beans, fruits, and vegetables can add bulk and brown color back.
  • Stay hydrated – Drinking enough fluids can help normalize bowel movements. Aim for 6-8 glasses of water daily.
  • Take probiotics – Probiotic supplements can promote healthy gut bacteria to support digestion. Ask your doctor for a recommendation.
  • Monitor consistency – Note any ongoing diarrhea or constipation and report it to your doctor.
  • Record diet and medications – Keep a food diary and medication log to help identify causes of green stool.

Conclusion

While green-colored stool may look alarming, it’s rarely a major concern. In most cases, it resolves on its own after a day or two. Persistent green diarrhea or other worrisome symptoms should be evaluated promptly by a doctor to check for underlying conditions. Try limiting artificial colors, increasing fiber, and staying hydrated to help return your stool to a normal brown color. Pay attention to consistency and report any ongoing diarrhea or constipation to your healthcare provider as well.

We’re Emma Carole Paradis and Kimberly Carole, the owners and designers of Impeccable Nest, based in Bedford, New Hampshire. A mother-daughter team with a love of design. Originally from Manhattan Beach, California, now based in Bedford, New Hampshire, we bring a Southern California cool and New England tradition to our design. Not only do we work together…we also live together in a multi-generational home…and a home that they are known to design for others.

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